Gluten Free Nutty Fruit Bars

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INGREDIENTS

1 ½ cups certified GF oats

1 ½ cups shredded coconut

½ cup ground almond

½ cup ground flax

½ cup hulled hemp seeds

½ cup unsalted sunflower seeds

½ cup unsalted pumpkin seeds

½ cup walnut crumbs

½ cup chopped almonds

¼ cup dried cranberries

¼ cup raisins

¼ cup coconut palm sugar

1 cup honey

2 eggs

½ cup tahini or sunflower butter or pea butter

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 325ºF

Generously grease a 9” X 13” glass cake pan.

In a very large bowl, mix together all of the dry ingredients.

Make a well in the center.

In a small mixer bowl, blend together all of the wet ingredients and pour into the well you made in the dry ingredients.

Using a spatula or your hands, mix well until all the ingredients are wet.

Press into the prepared pan. (I used a large piece of waxed paper with butter on it to press)

Bake for about 30 minutes or until the edges just start to brown.

Allow to cool for 5 minutes and cut into squares.

Cool completely and remove from the pan.

These are peanut free, delicious and full of fibre.  A great take along snack

Honey Baked Chicken Breasts

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INGREDIENTS
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
3 tbs coconut oil, melted
4 tbs honey
1tsp GF Dijon style mustard
Pinch of curry powder

DIRECTIONS
Place the chicken pieces into the slow cooker.
Combine the coconut oil, honey, mustard and curry powder in a small bowl and mix well.

Place chicken in an oven proof casserole dish.
Pour mixture over chicken pieces.


Cover and cook on low for 1 hour. (Baste about ½ way through)
Serve over brown rice and have a spinach salad on the side.

Serves 2

Aunt Jayne’s Coconut Macaroons

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INGREDIENTS

2 eggs, well beaten

½ cups coconut palm sugar

1 tsp vanilla

3 ½  cups unsweetened shredded coconut

DIRECTIONS

Preheat oven to 350ºF

Grease a large cookie sheet.

In a large bowl, beat the egg.

Add the sugar and vanilla and beat again.

Add the coconut and mix well.

Using an ice cream scoop, drop the mixture onto the cookie sheet.

Flatten slightly with the bowl of the scoop.

Bake 15 to 20 minutes. You want them golden but not over-cooked.

Cool for about 5 minutes then loosen from the cookies sheet.

VARIATIONS:

Melt ½ cup GF chocolate chips and drizzle over the cookies.

 

Awww Nuts! They Are Gluten Free!

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Want a snack that keeps well, travels well and satisfies?  Try a handful of nuts.

Nuts are naturally gluten free but beware!  Some canned nuts may contain wheat.  Always read your label.

What else do nuts contain? 

 

Almondsare rich in dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals as well as numerous health promoting phyto-chemicals.  They are also rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids like oleic and palmitoleic acids that help to lower LDL or “bad cholesterol” and increase HDL or “good cholesterol.”

They are an excellent source of vitamin E, B-complex groups of vitamins such as riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B-6, and folates.

 

Brazil nuts are high in selenium. They are also a very good source of vitamin E, copper, magnesium, manganese, potassium, calcium, iron, phosphorus, and zinc.

Cashews are packed with soluble dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals and numerous health-promoting phyto-chemicals that help protect from diseases and cancers.  They are also rich in oleic and palmitoleic acids, manganese, potassium, copper, iron, magnesium, zinc, copper and selenium.  Not to mention pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), riboflavin, and thiamin (vitamin B-1).

Hazel Nuts are high in dietary fiber and folate as well as riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine (vitamin B-6), and minerals such as manganese, potassium, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, iron, zinc, and selenium.

Peanuts although they are really a legume, I thought they should be included her as well.  Peanuts are an excellent source of resveratrol (A polyphenol antioxidant, which has been found to have protective function against cancers, heart disease, degenerative nerve disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and viral/fungal infections.)  In addition, peanuts contain riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B-6, folates, copper, manganese, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium.

Pistachios contain such things as carotenes, vitamin E, and polyphenolic antioxidant compounds, riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, vitamin B-6, folates, copper, manganese, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium.

Walnuts are an excellent source of all important omega-3 essential fatty acids like linoleic acid, alpha linolenic acid (ALA) and arachidonic acids. They also contain Vitamin E, riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, pantothenic acid, and vitamin B-6, folates, like manganese, copper, potassium, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium.

So have some nuts. Toss some in your cereal in the morning; take some with you in the car. (If you take public transportation – please don’t bring nuts) Put some in your lunch box. (If none of your co-workers/other students etc. are not allergic)

WARNINGS:

Some people have deadly allergies to nuts – Please take care to ask those you are in contact with if they are allergic.  Just having nuts in close proximity can kill them!

After eating your nuts, wash your hands thoroughly so that you do not contaminate door handles, elevator buttons etc. with nuts.

If you have been diagnosed with a nut allergy – do not eat nuts!

These warnings may sound ridiculous to you but to someone with a nut allergy, it is a matter of life and death – literally!

If you are trying to lose weight – go easy on the nuts.  They are fattening.

 

 

 

 

 

Cheaters Never Prosper!

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Have you ever heard the expression “Cheaters never prosper”?  Well, if you have Celiac disease and you “cheat” and eat something with gluten in it, not only will you not prosper, you could die!

Sounds very dramatic, right?  I am serious. 

Those of us who have Celiac disease can have devastating effects from ingesting gluten and we might not even notice.   Gluten destroys the villi in the small intestine and if the behaviour continues, the body loses it’s ability to absorb essential nutrients from the food.  You can literally become malnourished!

I have never cheated since going gluten free in 2007 and I never will.  I hope none of you ever will either.

Take care of you,

Aunt Jayne

Gluten Peptides in Human Breast Milk: Implications for Cow’s Milk???

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“Bottom line: A very small number of published studies report finding peptides in exceedingly small amounts (measured in parts per billion) in human breast milk. If dairy cows are fed wheat, barley, and rye grain (not a common occurrence from what I’ve been told) and if they have the same difficulty digesting (breaking down) gluten protein as humans, it is reasonable to wonder if gluten peptides may be found in cow’s milk too. However, based on testing, no significant amounts of gluten peptides have been detected in cow’s milk.”

 

Read the rest of the article here:  http://ning.it/zYT0Tp

Spectrum of gluten-related disorders: consensus on new nomenclature and classification

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“Abstract

A decade ago celiac disease was considered extremely rare outside Europe and, therefore, was almost completely

ignored by health care professionals. In only 10 years, key milestones have moved celiac disease from obscurity

into the popular spotlight worldwide. Now we are observing another interesting phenomenon that is generating

great confusion among health care professionals. The number of individuals embracing a gluten-free diet (GFD)

appears much higher than the projected number of celiac disease patients, fueling a global market of gluten-free

products approaching $2.5 billion (US) in global sales in 2010. This trend is supported by the notion that, along

with celiac disease, other conditions related to the ingestion of gluten have emerged as health care concerns. This

review will summarize our current knowledge about the three main forms of gluten reactions: allergic (wheat

allergy), autoimmune (celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis and gluten ataxia) and possibly immune-mediated

(gluten sensitivity), and also outline pathogenic, clinical and epidemiological differences and propose new

nomenclature and classifications.”

 

Read the entire publication here:   http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1741-7015-10-13.pdf